NASC Speakers Bureau

NUMISMATIC ASSOCIATION

OF

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA


SPEAKER’S LIST

AND

VISUAL EDUCATION

LIBRARY

JANUARY, 2016


Scan 43

William J. “Bill” Grant

This list is dedicated to William J Grant, known to everyone as Bill, who served as President of the NASC, 1994-1995 and General Chairman of the Golden State Coin Show from 1996 through 1998. For many years he published the list of members who were willing to present programs at local coin club meetings, in fact, he was named “Speaker of the Year” in 2003.

Bill served the NASC and the hobby in so many ways including the ANA Anaheim Convention Committee and the CSNA Symposium Committee as Audio-Visual Chairman for 18 years.

Together with his wife Freddie, the Grants could be called “The Numismatic Couple of the Year”. They were also deeply committed to another hobby group known as the “Bell Ringers”. In fact, if a bell rang for every time Bill offered his services to our hobby, the bell would still be ringing and perhaps, if you listen very carefully, you may hear it ringing from above.

"Thank You" to Tom Fitzgerald for this dedication page.


N.A.S.C. SPEAKER’S BUREAU

The NUMISMATIC ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (NASC) is pleased to further the educational aspects of the Speaker’s Bureau. The Bureau acts as a central clearing house for organizing a listing of speakers, topics and audio-visual material helpful for assisting individual coin club program chairpersons in their efforts to secure outstanding educational programs on a monthly meeting basis.

If you would like to join the speaker’s list, please contact the Speaker’s Bureau Chairman, Virginia Bourke, 10601 Vista Camino, Lakeside, CA 92040-1605. Phone 619 390-0047 or E-Mailvlbourke@cox.net.


SUGGESTIONS AND GUIDELINES FOR PROGRAM CHAIRPERSONS:

Good communications between the club program chairperson and the invited speaker is of the utmost importance. The following suggestions and guidelines are to assist you:

1. Contact a potential speaker at least two months before the month of his or her scheduled presentation.

2. If this is done verbally, follow up with a letter of written confirmation so the speaker can place the date on his or her calendar.

3. When telephoning, e-mailing, or writing in advance, confirm both the date and topic with the speaker. It might be a good idea to send a postcard reminder if the speaker is scheduled one month before the date of his or her program.

4. Send a detailed map or adequate written directions on how to find your meeting place. Include your phone number.

5. When it is published, send the speaker a copy of your club newsletter that announces his or her program. It is also a courtesy to send the following month’s newsletter if it acknowledges or gives a recap of the speaker’s program. A follow-up letter from the program chairperson or the Corresponding Secretary is also a kind gesture.

6. Get the specific needs for the speaker to prepare his or her program, i.e., if slides, does he or she need a projector, screen, extension cord or exhibit space, table, etc.

7. Obtain biographical information about the speaker so he or she may be properly introduced. (You can often obtain this from the speaker directly.)

8. Make your speaker feel welcome. Introduce them to the officers before the meeting, especially the President.

9. Make sure your speaker knows how much time he or she has for their presentation and allow for a question and answer period.

10. Remember, all speakers are presenting a program essentially free of charge. It is a kind gesture to reimburse the speaker for travel costs, gas, etc. A suggestion is $15 for short distances and $20 for long distances. In addition, may we suggest some door prize tickets or a numismatic prize as a token of your appreciation.

11. A Certificate of Appreciation is greatly appreciated. This can be a club certificate, a State Organization certificate or a certificate from the ANA. Speaker certificates are available from the ANA, AINA, NASC or CSNA at no charge to member clubs.


SPEAKER’S LIST IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

HOOGEVEEN, ALBERTUS
P. O. Box 222, Downey, CA 90241-0222
Home 562 862-5028, Cell 562 862-6666
E-mail: arapaho2@rr.com

1. My Years Collecting Copper, Silver and Gold

2. Boy Scout Medals, Tokens and Ribbons

3. History of Proof Coinage

4. Collecting So-Called Dollars

5. Virginia City and the Carson City Mint

6. The Coins of Queen Wilhelmina

7. The North Carolina Gold Rush of 1828 and Bechtler Coinage

8. Collecting Short Sets of U.S. Coins

9. The Decimal Coinage of the Netherlands

10. The Provincial Coinage of the Netherlands

NOTE. Numbers 7, 9 and 10 require a large laptop computer and digital projector to be provided by the host club.

Travel up to 300 miles. Advance notice required plus a newsletter reminder. Reimbursement not necessary but appreciated. Length 30 to 35 minutes.


HUNT, JIM
1183 Nile Avenue
Chula Vista, CA 91911-3720
Home: 619 427-2519
E-Mail:eandjonthenile@cox.net

1. California’s Gold Rush Era Money

2. Collecting Gold Coins

3. The California Gold Rush

4. What Could Happen When You Go

5. Appalachian Gold

6. The Comstock Lode and the Carson City Mint

7. Denver Mint Gold

8. Wells Fargo & Co.

9. Other Topics are available

NOTE: Travel less than 50 miles, no reimbursement – over 50 miles honorarium and/or expenses needed. Advance notice 1 month is preferred. Length 15 to 45 minutes, depending on presentation. Podium appreciated.


IVERSEN, PHIL
P. O. Box 5207, Sherman Oaks, CA 91413-5207
Home: 818 509-9774
E-mail:
Phil_Iversen@yahoo.com

1. Coin World, The First Year

2. Topical Numismatics Tales – Part I

3. Topical Numismatics Tales – Part II

4. Exonumia, Part I

5. Exonumia, Part II

6. Rocky Mountain High, 1996 ANA Convention & National Headquarters Tour

7. The Ringling Brothers Circus

8. Solomon’s Dance Hall

9. Numismatic Oregon, 1998 ANA Convention

10. Numismatic Washington, My Home State

11. Los Angeles Underground, Riding the Subway

12. Lewis & Clark, Sighting the Pacific

13. The Statue of Liberty

14. Collecting World Currency – Part I

15. Collecting World Currency – Part II

16. Huntington Hotel Depression Scrip

17. Collecting Play Money


KATZMAN, HAROLD
P. O. Box 3382, Tustin, CA 92081-3382
Home: 714 838-0861
E-mail:
haroldkatzman@yahoo.com

1. Columbia-Gem of the Space Ocean – Part slide show

2. My Ten Favorite Numismatic Collectibles

3. The Wonderful World of PNC’s

4. Medal Collecting

5. Spruce Goose (slides)

6. Mount Saint Helens (slides)

7. California Missions (slides)

8. Vatican Art (slides)

9. Hearst Castle (slides)

10. The Season of Yosemite (slides)

11. Journey to the Last Total Eclipse of the 20th Century (slides)

12. Other Topics can be arranged

NOTE: Travel 200 miles (more if you cover expenses). Advance notice 2 or 3 months in advance (occasionally can do last minute). Gas money preferred especially on longer trips. Program lengths 25 to 40 minutes, but can work within your time restrictions.


ONTKO, MICHAEL
E-mail:meontko@earthlink.net

I have numerous topics on world coins, most specifically Mexico, Latin American and France. My most recent effort was a three part presentation on the Coinage of the Papal States based on the Thomas Fitzgerald Collection. NOTE: Condition is that a club that hosts me has to send a speaker to the GOCCC within one year.


OSTROMECKI, WALTER
5914 Hesperia Avenue, Encino, CA 91316-1014
Home: 818 317-6966 or 617 6966
E-Mail: ostromecki@money.org or waltomfl1@earthlink.net

1. Dumb Coins

2. Famous Women Pictured on Currency

3. Funeral Money – AKA, Money of the Afterlife

4. B$2FDC’S – The Numismatic Fun and Postmarked-Created Types of Paper Money Collectibles on $2 bills on April 13, July 4 and beyond. A 40 plus year look back at the historic numismatic events of the Bicentennial

5. Some Women Behind our US Money

6. A Numismatic Tribute to Polish Americans

7. Paranormal Coins and Currency – A Power-Point Program

8. Nixon’s Numismatic Legacy

9. Why the ANA? What it has to Offer Educationally to Enhance Numismatist Learning for all ages

10. Can Coins be Sexy?

11. What is it? Can you Identify the coin? A Fun Audience Quiz

12. Counterfeiting Coin Detecting Basics 101. Audience Participation

13. Test Your Coin Grading Skills. Audience Participation

**Boy/Girl Scout Merit Badge and Youth Programs.

NOTE: Travel 300+ miles. Will travel to Major National Shows to speak. Advance notice, preferred, sometimes available on the spur of the moment if close to home. Reimbursement not necessary but always appreciated. Length about 20 to 60 minutes. Tailor made to fit club.

***ALSO has a number of ANA and other slides programs/videos for loan. Call for titles and mailing details.


PHILLIPS, JAMES
P. O. Box 36, Hemet, CA 92546
Home: 951 767-0494
E-mail:
jimjumper@hughes.net

1. Fractional Currency

2. Confederate and Southern States Fractional Currency

3. Obsolete Fractional Currency

4. Andrews’ Raiders and the General (The Great Train Chase)

5. Coin Show Exonumia (Interesting stuff from the Coin Show Trail)

6. Operation Bernhard Notes

Will travel in Southern California. Advance notice with Newsletter reminder. Last moment is possible. Lecture lengths adjustable depending on needs. Reimbursement not necessary but appreciated.


TAYLOR, SOL, DR.
12345 Ventura Blvd., Unit A., Studio City, CA 91604
Office: 818 515-5395
E-Mail: SolTaylor2@aol.com

1. Coin Collecting In the 1930’s to 1950’s

No projector needed. Travel within 50 miles. Gas money helps. Length 30 to 45 minutes plus question and answer period. Need 30 day advance notice


TURRINI, MICHAEL S. “STAN”
P. O. Box 4104, Vallejo, CA 94590-0410
Cell: 707 246-6327
E-mail:
EmperorI@juno.com

1. Counting Us, (several versions for this audience participation program)

2. First Strike Ceremony (Three First Strike events from the 1980’s at the San Francisco Mint and in Washington, D.C. in color slides.

3. The Carnegie Medal, Heroes of Civilization

4. Commemorative Coinage Vetoes

5. Autographs: An Introduction

6. Collecting Old Checks and Stock Certificates

7. What is a Collection?

8. Tools of the Trade

9. What is Money? (large display requiring tables and exhibit cases)

10. Canadian Dollars (PowerPoint)

11. Some Things Off My Desk (or What is at The Bottom of My Safe Deposit Box!)

12. CSNA Slides with slide projector

Due to distance and travel required, adequate advance notice is mandatory. Speaker would prefer to combine programs and visits to several local coin clubs. Stipend appreciated. Needs: Screen and slide projector for slide programs and table with display cases for others. Topics and time lengths can be adjusted to fit local needs, but set-up time required.


N.A.S.C. VISUAL EDUCATION
VIDEO CASSETTES

The following listed videocassettes are currently available for your viewing pleasure:

1. .999 Fine

The story of the Carson City silver dollar tells about the famed coins and its unique place in American history. It covers the period from early mining in Colorado to the government sales of this popular “CC” coin. (28 minutes).

2. Grading Mint State U. S. Coins

Learn the basics of coin grading with emphasis on half dollars, dollars and gold coins. Important topics include lighting, eye appeal, strike, luster, toning and other important aspects of this topical area. (88 minutes)

3. Classic U. S. Gold coins of the 20th Century

Journey through history with America’s 20th century gold coinage from the early gold rush in California to the Gold Redemption Act of 1933 with many interesting stories. (23 minutes)

4, The Granite Lady

An engaging review of the heyday of the gold rush, the terrible San Francisco earthquake and fire and the role played by the old San Francisco Mint. (31 minutes).

5. The Medal Maker

Once thought lost, this 1929 film shows coin and medal designer/sculptor Laura Gardin Fraser working in her famous New York apartment studio. The complete process, from start to finish of making a medal is depicted in fascinating black and white video. (30 minutes).

6. Money: History in Your Hands

This popular video is narrated by actor James Earl Jones who guides you through a numismatic history lesson from ancient to modern times. Many prominent people are portrayed on both coin and currency. (31 minutes)

7. Keys to the Treasury

This video takes you on an historical tour of the main Treasury building and its many different agencies. See coinage and currency production plus anti-counterfeit techniques. (34 minutes).

8. The Making of Money

View some of the first paper currency from Massachusetts in 1690, the first Continental Dollar printed in Maryland in 1765, private bank notes from the 19th century and today’s redesigned currency. (24 minutes).

9. Mount Rushmore

America has many national monuments and Mt. Rushmore is the biggest in size. Watch as a mountainside in South Dakota is transformed into the faces of four U.S. Presidents by the man also responsible for creating the Stone Mountain monument. (60 minutes)

10. Ship of Gold

Travel back in time to when a hurricane sank the ship SS Central America in the Atlantic Ocean, then fast-forward 130 years when her booty of gold coins, bars and nuggets were reclaimed in an amazing salvage operation. (50 minutes)

11. Treasure of the Great Reef

In 1961 Sir Arthur C. Clark (of 2001 fame) was living in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) while scouting an underworld location for a movie, his dive associates discover the remains of a shipwreck on the Great Basses Reef.Buried among the debris are masses of silver coins still in the sacks they were packed in 30 years before GeorgeWashington was born. (22 minutes)

12. Commemorative Silver Coinage of 1936

1936 saw the most prolific number of commemorative coins ever issued by the U.S. – 34 separate coins with 21different types. Anyone who collects commemoratives will be entertained by the stories told by dealer BradKaroleff. (62 minutes).

13. Collecting U. S. Paper Money

This video shows full screen images and close-up pictures of some of America’s most beautiful and collectible notes.Six well known specialists tell how to start a collection and ways to take care of it. Beginners and advanced collectors will enjoy the program. (37 minutes)


To borrow any of the above videos, please contact:

Phil Iversen.
P. O. Box 5207, Sherman Oaks, CA 91413.
Phone 818 509-9774
E-Mail Phil_Iversen@yahoo.com (underscore between l and I)


Contacting us...

e-mail: jimjumper@hughes.net

snail-mail: Harold Katzman
NASC
P.O. Box 3382
Tustin, CA 92781


James Phillips 2017